4*, blog tours, book review

#BlogTour #BookReview Murder Undeniable by Anita Waller. @anitamayw @BloodhoundBook

Murder Undeniable Blog Blitz banner

Woohoo! Another Anita Waller book is out, she really is spoiling us as it really isn’t that long since her last book was out.

My Review:

Regular readers of my book blog will know that I am a big fan of author Anita Waller, I love her books and her characters and how she manages to find reasons for her murders, they are never senseless, they always have a reason.

I wasn’t sure about Murder Undeniable, I knew that it was the first book in a series and if I’m honest I do prefer standalone books, well that’s until I’m into a series and then I love getting to revisit the characters, but I feel like agreeing to read book one of a series might be committing myself to read every book in the series to come.

As always Waller creates great characters that are interesting, different and believable. I really liked all the characters in Murder Undeniable, and the story hooked me in and kept me reading. I’ve been struggling to get into books recently and this book changed that, it is easy to read and easy to follow and that is what I needed.

My one gripe would be that it was all a bit predictable, although that didn’t impact on my enjoyment of the book, I do like to be kept guessing.

But once again Waller has written a great book and the questions that I’m sure that you are all wondering is whether I would read more of the series? Well, there isn’t any doubt in my mind that I will.

Thank you to Bloodhound Books for a copy of Murder Undeniable by Anita Waller. I was under no obligation to review the book and all thoughts are my own.

Blurb:

Murder-Undeniable-Kindle

Katerina Rowe, a Deacon at the church in the sleepy village of Eyam, has a fulfilled life. She is happily married to Leon and her work is rewarding.

But everything changes when she discovers the body of a man and a badly beaten woman, Beth, in the alleyway behind her husband’s pharmacy.

Drawn to the young woman she saved, Kat finds herself embroiled in a baffling mystery.

When Beth’s house is set on fire, Kat offers the young woman sanctuary in her home and soon the pair begin investigating the murder, with some help from Beth’s feisty grandmother, Doris. But neither the police, nor Leon, nor the criminals want Kat and Beth looking into their affairs and the sleuths quickly find themselves out of their depth…

Can Kat and Beth solve the mystery and walk away unscathed?

About The Author:

anitawaller
Anita Waller was born in Sheffield, South Yorkshire in 1946. She married Dave in 1967 and they have three adult children.

She began writing when she was around 8 years of age, writing ‘compositions’ at junior school that became books with chapters.

In 1995 she sent Beautiful to a publisher and as they reached the contract stage the publisher went into liquidation. As a result, the book was consigned to the attic in dejected disgust but in 2013 it was dragged out again for an enforced complete re-type. The original was written on an Amstrad 8256 and the only thing that remained was one hard copy.

Anita is not a typist and it was painfully reworked over two years, submitted to Bloodhound Books who, within three days of reading it, offered her a contract. 31 August 2015 saw its release into the wide world.

Following the outstanding success of Beautiful, she began a sequel on 27 December 2015, finishing it on 19 March 2016. The new novel, Angel, was launched on 7 May 2016.

34 Days followed, with its launch in October 2016. This was a huge success, particularly in the United States. While this, her third book in the psychological thriller genre, was flying out in all directions, she began work on her fourth book.

Winterscroft was a change in genre. It is a supernatural tale, set in Castleton, Derbyshire, and its release date was February 2017.

While she was writing Winterscroft, it became very clear from reading reviews that a sequel to 34 days was needed, and she began work on that. Bloodhound Books launched Strategy, on 10 August 2017.

Her next book, launched February 2018 and entitled Captor, is a psychological thriller, set exclusively in Sheffield. It was an instant success, both in the UK and the US.

Then along came Game Players… once more set in Sheffield, the story involves a group of six children who have each other’s backs to a remarkable extent. The darker, criminal side of Sheffield is explored, with the book launching 18 May 2018.

Malignant arrived in the world on 10 October 2018, her eighth book in three years.

And now Anita is working on her first series, the Kat and Mouse trilogy, set in the beautiful Derbyshire village of Eyam. The first in the series, Murder Undeniable, launches 10 December 2018.

In her life away from the computer in the corner of her kitchen, she is a Sheffield Wednesday supporter with blue blood in her veins! The club was particularly helpful during the writing of 34 Days, as a couple of matches feature in the novel, along with Ross Wallace. Information was needed, and they provided it.

Her genre is murder – necessary murder.

Author’s links:

Email: anitamayw@yahoo.co.uk

Website: www.anitamayw.wixsite.com/anitawaller

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/anitawaller2015/ @anitawaller2015

Amazon page: www.amazon.co.uk/Anita-Waller/e/B014RQFCRS/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/anitamayw @anitamayw

Murder Undeniable by Anita Waller is out now and is available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

blog tours, book review, Guest Reviewer, non-fiction

#BlogTour #BookReview The Story of Now That’s What I Call Music in 100 Artists by Michael Mulligan. @MotorCityMick @TrapezeBooks @Simon_Burnton @NOWMusic #Now100 #music #Christmas

Trapeze Xmas 2

Now this really is rather exciting. Trapeze who publishes a wide range of books it showcases just how wide that range is by having a 12 days of Christmas blog tour with each day featuring a different book that they have published this year.

I don’t know about you but I love the idea and think that it is a little bit different and really rather exciting. I quickly looked at the books that would feature on the tour and picked a few that I wanted to read and review. Firstly there was Noel the Supervet, as an avid watcher of his show I wanted to read his book, then there was The Craftman by the Brilliant Sharon Bolton, or perhaps Hangman by Daniel Cole, whose first book, Ragdoll, was blooming brilliant.

So many good books to choose from and so I rushed to get my choice in, keen to get a book that I really wanted. So when the email came back saying that I had a spot on the tour I wasn’t quite expecting it to be the book that it was. Somewhat confused I checked the email that I had sent and sure enough, in my haste, I had put a wrong number down. What was the book I hear you ask? It was Now That’s What I Call Music in 100 Artists.

I do like music, just not that much. But here I was and I’d made a commitment so I was not quite sure what to do, a book like this deserved someone with a passion for music to review it, someone who used to wait eagerly for the release of that years’ Now That’s What I Call Music CD (or cassette!). Luckily, I knew just the person. Step in my brother, a music lover since he was a young boy and the perfect person to read and review the book.

nowmusic

Review:

Anyone who has had any kind of interest in pop music at any stage of their lives is likely to have owned and cherished a Now That’s What You Call Music album. They have chronicled the charts for 35 years, since their first brazen attempt to fleece the Christmas gift market in late 1983, and are still doing it in 2018, with Now 101 currently top of the compilation album charts (the top 20 also includes Now 100, Now That’s What I Call Christmas, Now That’s What I Call Love Songs, Now That’s What I Call Rock ‘n Roll, Now That’s What I Call Easy, Now That’s What I Call Disney, Now That’s What I Call Now (100 Hits from 100 Nows!), and the unrelated but engagingly titled 100 Percent Clubland EDM Bangers), plus board games, card games, interactive DVD games and the occasional book, of which The Story of NOW That’s What I Call Music in 100 Artists is the latest.

There’s an OK book in here somewhere. Some effort and talent was put into the research and writing of it, whereupon the copy was placed into the hands of the kid on work experience in the layout department, and it went downhill from there.

It’s a shame to be superficial, but it just doesn’t look very good. Each of the 100 artists has a two-page spread, one containing a photo and a brief biography focusing predominately on their compilation appearances and the other containing trivia related to some of the Now albums they featured on. Sometimes the biography is on the left page of the spread and the albums on the right, which makes a great deal of sense, and sometimes it’s the other way round, which is confusing. It is like the designer of a novel putting the words CHAPTER TWO in large letters on the top of the second page of chapter two, and leaving the reader to work out where the first page fits in. This is the most significant quibble, but nothing about the design impresses – not the fonts, not the panels, not the page numbers, literally none of it (though the front cover is quite good).

The trek through the 100 artists is occasionally broken up by random other stuff. There are, for example, two pages which list the titles of songs from Now compilations that have place names in them. It looks like it was written in 10 minutes and laid out in two, which makes it considerably more impressive than the pages dedicated to songs from Now compilations with the word kiss in the title. There is no way that any sentient human could find any of this interesting, and it looks worse than it reads. The book would be big enough without this random padding, and better to boot.

The publicity blurb boasts that it is “jam packed with amazing facts and ‘Well I never!’ moments”, which is not entirely hyperbolic. There are lots of interesting details that will raise the eyebrow of pop-nerds, mainly about unnoticed producers, uncredited celebrity backing vocalists and unexpected links with other Now-featured artists. If you think it is interesting that Johan Renck, a member of one-hit wonders Stakka Bo (Here We Go was on Now 26), directed the video for Pet Shop Boys’ She’s Madonna (Now 66), or that the same harmonica player appeared on Will Young’s Switch It On (Now 62) and All Around the World by Oasis (Now 63), and you don’t mind a bit of amateurish layout, then this book is for you.
Now albums have always featured top-notch design and their website is phenomenal, but it’s a shame that the people responsible for that sterling work were on their tea break in the five minutes that this book was put together.

Blurb:

Everyone remembers their first NOW album. Since NOW That’s What I Call Music Volume 1 was released in 1983 on double vinyl and double cassette, NOW has become synonymous with pop music and has featured some of the most iconic artists of the last three decades.

To celebrate the release of the 100th NOW album, The Story of NOW That’s What I Call Music in 100 Artists looks back at some of the most memorable – and occasionally regrettable – hits of the last 35 years!

Jam packed with amazing facts and ‘Well I never!’ moments about the 4,000+ artists to have graced the NOW track listings – from Phil Collins to Pharrell, Bananarama to Lady Gaga and Peter Andre to Pet Shop Boys – The Story of NOWis a celebration of pop music through the decades. So plug in your earphones and pump up the volume, because this party is just getting started!

About The Author:

michaelmulligan
Michael Mulligan taken from Twitter.

Michael Mulligan was born on the outskirts of Southend-on-Sea, in Essex, which is where he purchased his first single, ‘School’s Out’ by Alice Cooper. As a teenager he’d buy as many as five music newspapers each week (when there were such things) and would gauge the growth of his music knowledge by his ability to finish the crossword puzzle.

Shortly before NOW That’s What I Call Music Volume 17 was released he got a job in his local record shop. For the next twenty-five years he worked in all manner of music retailers, and more recently he has been a consultant for record labels, mining their archives for overlooked gems.

Michael once made Kylie Minogue laugh, and has the photographic evidence to prove it. Though it is entirely possible she was just being polite. He lives in north London with two cats, a patient and indulgent wife and a ‘no way too large’ record collection.

The Story of Now That’s What I Call Music in 100 Artists by Michael Mulligan is out now and is available from Amazon UK.

4*, blog tours, book review

#BlogTour #BookReview Last Light by Helen Phifer.

Last Light - Blog Tour

I’m so excited about being part of this blog blitz for Last Light by Helen Phifer. It has been about a year since the last book in the Lucy Harwin series and it has been too long a wait!

My Review:

I really like Helen Phifer and her Lucy Harwin series and so when I saw that there was a new one coming out I knew that I had to read it.

I was happily reading Last Light but I have to admit that I was getting a bit confused, some of what Lucy was saying just wasn’t making sense and I was worrying that my memory was failing me. After a few more times of this happening I decided to read the blurb, something that I rarely do before I read a book. It was then that I realised that this was, in fact, a prequel. Once I knew that I got right back into the book and it all made sense.

So if you have read the previous books in the Lucy Harwin series then you will love this book. If you haven’t read any then you will also love this book but perhaps you should read it before you read the other books in the series.

I really like Lucy Harwin, she isn’t perfect, far from it, but she’s real and she isn’t a hugely amazingly talented detective that manages to solve crimes that would stump any other detective, as can often be the case in detective books. She’s real, she struggles, she has self doubt and she really, really cares.

The author also has a great way of coming up with crimes that are really rather unpleasant, which adds to the story and the tension and the urgency. With this one, I worked out who the killer was very early on but that didn’t impact the read for me at all as I often doubted what I’d thought. I really liked how we got the back story of the killer so we understood why he was killing those that he was, and a kind of understanding of how he became a killer.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading Last Light by Helen Phifer, if you like your female detective series then this is a great series for you to try!

Thank you to Bookouture for a copy of Last Light by Helen Phifer. I was under no obligation to review the book and all thoughts are my own.

 

Blurb:

Last-Light-KindleLucy watches the pathologist leave, then turns to the nameless victim on the table. ‘I promise I will catch whoever did this to you,’ she whispers.

In charge of a new team, Detective Lucy Harwin is called out to attend the discovery of a woman’s body in an abandoned, crumbling church, and is quickly plunged into a case that will test her leadership skills to the limit.

With no leads except the crudely-fashioned crucifix the victim was displayed on, Lucy is at a complete loss. That is, until another body turns up: an elderly woman who devoted her life to the church.

Faced with a killer stalking the streets of her small coastal town, while also throwing herself into work to forget the love of her life, Lucy’s first case is turning into a nightmare.

Linking the killer to the church where her own teenage daughter volunteers, it seems the threat is quickly drawing closer to Lucy and those she loves. Can she catch this monster and prevent a tragedy that will tear her world apart?

An addictive and unputdownable crime thriller that will hook fans of Patricia Gibney, LJ Ross and Angela Marsons from the very first page.

About The Author:

Helen Phifer author pictureHelen Phifer lives in a small town called Barrow-in-Furness with her husband and five children.

Helen has always loved writing and reading. Her love of horror films and novels is legendary. Helen adores reading books which make the hair on the back of her neck stand on end. Unable to find enough scary stories to read she decided to write her own.

 

Author Social Media Links:

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Helenphifer1

Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/helenphifer

Twitter:      https://twitter.com/helenphifer1

Website:     https://www.helenphifer.com

Last Light by Helen Phifer is out on 16th November 2018 and is available from AmazoniBooksKobo and Google Books.

4*, blog tours, book review

#BlogTour #BookReview The Night Visitor by Patrick Redmond. @PRedmondAuthor @BooksManatee #TheNightVisitor

The-Night-Visitor-(NEW)

I’m very excited to be on the blog tour for The Night Visitor by Patrick Redmond today.

My Review:

Well, where do I start with this review? I really wasn’t sure what to expect when I started to read The Night Visitor by Patrick Redmond, I’m not really a fan of supernatural books but this one sounded interesting and I was keen to read it.

The book starts with Meg as a young girl, she loves her sister and her mum, she loves her dad too but she knows a bit more about what he’s going to do in the future than most people and so isn’t quite so keen on him.

I absolutely loved this part of the book, Meg was a brilliant character and the love that she had for her sister and Mother shone through every page and I have to admit that I was sad when the book moved forward to when Meg was an adult.

I’d had no doubt that Meg would do well for herself, and sure enough, she had. Well on paper anyway but in reality, she was incredibly sad and lonely and kept trying to run from her troubles.

She moves from bustling London to a small village in Cornwall and soon starts to feel at home. She befriends her neighbour, Dan, and they unexpectedly become friends. But soon enough creepy things start happening to Meg as her past starts to catch up with her. Unable to ignore it Meg decides to go with it and see where it takes her, not knowing that her life was going to change dramatically as a result.

I have to admit that I wasn’t always sure about Dan and Meg’s relationship, their friendship happened so quickly and sometimes it felt a little bit convenient for the story. But that is my only gripe as I really enjoyed reading The Night Visitor, I desperately wanted Meg to solve the puzzle and most of all, I wanted her to be happy. Clever writing makes you care like that about a character, and I really did care.

If you like your thrillers to have some added creepiness then this book is for you, even if you’re not so sure about the creepy element then go with it, it works in this story and it fits and it makes for a different read but one that makes you think and that was really fun to read.

Thank you to Manatee Books for a copy of The Night Visitor by Patrick Redmond. I was under no obligation to review the book and all thoughts are my own.

Blurb:

The Night Visitor CoverWhen does a gift become a curse?

Meg has a gift. She can change lives. But when tragedy strikes in childhood she vows never to use it again.
Now an adult, she is living in Cornwall; a place where the elements themselves have a life of their own. When they call she refuses to listen, fearful of the dark places where her gift can lead.

But the dead will not be silenced. They are stronger than her. And now they have chosen she is powerless to escape…

 

The Night Visitor by Patrick Redmond is out now and is available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

blog tours

#BlogTour Palm Beach Finland by Antti Tuomainen. #guestpost @OrendaBooks @antti_tuomainen #PalmBeachFinland

First Palm Beach BT Poster

Today it is my great pleasure to have a stop on the blog tour by Palm Beach Finland by Antti Tuomainen and published by Orenda Books. Antti is a great author and although I couldn’t fit in reading the book for my stop I’m delighted to have a guest post by him about writing funny crime. And that is something that he does well, the last book that I read of his, The Man Who Died, was really rather gruesome but also very funny.

Guest Post:

WRITING FUNNY CRIME, OR: WHAT I LEARNED FROM THE MARX BROTHERS WHEN I WAS SEVEN

I suppose something similar had already happened even earlier, but I do remember an afternoon in the late 1970s when I was watching television with my father in the northern suburb of Maunula in Helsinki, Finland, when something indeed clicked.

It was an old film, I could tell that by the crackling sound and the black and white picture that sometimes jumped a bit, or omitted a fraction of a second of screen time so the actors’ movements seemed suddenly quite angular. But all of that didn’t matter. I instantly knew it was a good one and right up my alley. My father laughed, I laughed. We probably laughed at different things, or at the same things for different reasons, but that’s just how it goes when one of you is seven and the other is 39. And after seeing that first one, I wanted to see more of those crazy Marx Brothers.

What does this have to with crime writing? Well, the Marx Brothers came to mind again a few years ago when I was at a certain kind of crossroads with my writing. After five very serious, very dark crime novels I needed a change. I believe what I needed to do was bring more of myself into my writing. What I now see I was missing in my writing was my other artistic love besides noir literature: comedy. As I was re-watching old comedies (that probably have more to do with my getting into this writing game in the first place than I am even giving credit for) I realized just how good those old Marx Brothers films were. Or, more precisely, how good their writers were and how much in fact I had learned that Sunday afternoon in 1979.

I watched the films and then read parts of the scripts (Monkey Business, Duck Soup, A Day at the Races) and found them even more anarchic, more absurd, more brilliant than the films. With the films, especially as Groucho or Chico launch into their tirades, everything flies and wizzes past you in nonsensical speed. (An argument could be made that it is nonsensical in any speed, but we’ll skip that.) In reading the scripts, I fully realized that each scene, each exchange was used to the max, so to speak.

To be honest, I never modeled any story or book after the Marx Brothers or even consider them a direct influence. But I do suppose I have tried to learn a thing or two about the optimal use of dialogue, the delightful power of the absurd, and just some perfectly timed silliness. (Of course, the Marx Brothers also tackled more serious issues like, for example, tyranny and dictatorship and war in Duck Soup. In their own way, it must be said.)

And, most importantly, I think, what happened that day long time ago was that a lamp got lit. My goodness, it’s great to laugh at crazy silly anarchic well-done stuff, and how it lifts the spirits and how it lightens the heart. I don’t know. At seven, I probably survived without analyzing the mental health effects of comedic entertainment. It was just enough to laugh and have a good time. (Which actually doesn’t sound too bad on this particular middle-aged grey day.) Anyway, I have the Marx Brothers to thank for something, certainly. And it’s just so nice to know there is writing and film that has stuff like this randomly selected (just by opening the script book) piece of dialogue:

GROUCHO: You’re just the man I wanted to see. If I could show you how to save 20 per cent, would you be interested? Of course you would. In the first place, your overhead is too high and your brow is too low. Interested already, aren’t you?

HELTON: I…

GROUCHO: Now, just wait till I get through.

HELTON: I haven’t got time.

GROUCHO: Now, there are two fellas trying to attack you, aren’t there? And there are two fellas trying to defend you.

HELTON: Why…

GROUCHO: Now that’s 50 per cent waste. Now why can’t you be attacked by your own bodyguards? Your life will be saved and that’s… that’s 100 per cent waste. Now what have you got? You’ve still got me and I’ll attack you for nothing.

Come to think of it, doesn’t that sound like the beginning of a certain kind of crime story?

Blurb:

PALM BEACH PROOF COVER AWFargo meets Baywatch in a darkly funny thriller by the critically acclaimed author of The Man Who Died Multi-platform, buzz-building marketing & publicity campaign Bestselling Finnish crime novel of 2017 Challenges the Scandinavian crime-fiction genre formula Sex, lies and ill-fitting swimwear … Sun Protection Factor 100 Jan Nyman, the ace detective of the covert operations unit of the National Central Police, is sent to a sleepy seaside town to investigate a mysterious death. Nyman arrives in the town dominated by a bizarre holiday village – the ‘hottest beach in Finland’. The suspect: Olivia Koski, who has only recently returned to her old hometown. The mission: find out what happened, by any means necessary. With a nod to Fargo, and the darkest noir, Palm Beach, Finland is both a page-turning thriller and a wicked black comedy about lust for money, fleeing dreams and people struggling at turning points in their lives … from the ‘King of Helsinki Noir’.

About The Author:

Antti TuomainenFinnish Antti Tuomainen was an award-winning copywriter when he made his literary debut in 2007 as a suspense author. The critically acclaimed My Brother’s Keeper was published two years later. In 2011, Tuomainen’s third novel, The Healer, was awarded the Clue Award for ‘Best Finnish Crime Novel of 2011’ and was shortlisted for the Glass Key Award. Two years later, in 2013, the Finnish press crowned Tuomainen the ‘King of Helsinki Noir’ when Dark as My Heart was published. With a piercing and evocative style, Tuomainen was one of the first to challenge the Scandinavian crime genre formula, and his poignant, dark and hilarious The Man Who Died became an international bestseller, shortlisting for the Petrona and Last Laugh      Awards.

Palm Beach Finland by Antti Tuomainen is out now and is available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

blog tours, book review, psychological thriller

#BlogTour #BookReview One Dark Night by Tom Bale. @t0mbale @bookouture

One Dark Night - Blog Tour Today I’m thrilled to be part of the blog tour for One Dark Night by Tom Bale and published by Bookouture, especially as today is publication day.

My Review:

There is one thing that you can always count on with Tom Bale and his book and that’s that the opening chapter will grab you and hook you in. One Dark Night is no different.

This book really gripped me from the start, the thought of stopping to confront a driver who cut you up and then realising that all is not as it seems and that your family is now at risk and at the mercy of some crazy criminals just because you wouldn’t let it go.

The first half of the book was a really thrilling read, the criminals really were crazy and I was never quite sure whether all or any of the family would escape. I was gripped and didn’t want to stop reading.

The second half kept the pace up but I felt that it just went too far into being not just unlikely but implausible. Many thrilling reads tread a fine line between realism and irrealism and that’s fine by me, I’m quite happy to suspend belief a bit if I’m going to get a book that twists and turns and keeps me hooked, but I felt that One Dark Night took it just a bit too far and at times it felt just a little bit silly.

But it was still a very enjoyable read and one that I have thought about quite a lot since finishing it. If you like your books fast paced and filled with danger then One Dark Night is a book for you.

Thank you to Bookouture for a copy of One Dark Night by Tom Bale. I was under no obligation to review the book and all thoughts are my own.

 Blurb:

One-Dark-Night-KindleHe sees his wife’s eyes watching him in the rear-view mirror, the kids up on their knees to get a better look. That’s when he hears the scream…

You’re driving home from a family outing one afternoon, when a speeding car cuts you up, nearly causing you to crash. Like anyone would, you pull over to confront the driver.

But a glance into the backseat of the speeding car reveals a woman fighting to escape. She is terrified and she’s screaming for your help: these men have murdered her husband…

What would you do?

An addictive thriller with plenty of twists – fans of Harlan CobenJames Patterson and Robert Dugoni will be completely hooked. 

 

About the Author:

Tom BaleTom Bale is the author of nine books, including the bestsellers SEE HOW THEY RUN and ALL FALL DOWN. His latest book, ONE DARK NIGHT, is out October 23rd 2018.

 

Social Media Links

Twitter: https://twitter.com/t0mbale

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tombalewriter/

Website: http://www.tombale.net/

One Dark Night by Tom Bale is out today and is available from Amazon, iBookskobo and Google Play.

4.5*, blog tours, book review

#BlogTour #BookReview Before I Let You Go by Kelly Rimmer. @KelRimmerWrites @headlinepg #BeforeILetYouGo #KellyRimmer #addiction #book

Before I let you go

I’m so pleased to be part of the blog tour for the paperback release of Before I Let You Go by the fabulous Kelly Rimmer.

My Review:

I’m a big Kelly Rimmer fan, every book of hers that I have read have been a brilliant read and one of them in particular completely blew me away.

So I was excited to read her latest book Before I Let You Go, and wanted to read it based only on who wrote it, the blurb really didn’t matter. As it turned out if I had read the blurb then it would have been a book that I wanted to read. Although there might have been some hesitation because when a book features someone in active addiction it can often misrepresent addiction or even glamourise it.

Not that that happens here, one of the best parts of the book is the accurate portrayal of addiction, how hard it is the break and the heartbreaking consequences that it can bring.

The relationship between sisters Lexie and Annie is delightfully complex, when they were young they both needed each other and had a wonderful relationship, but Lexie moved out and was unable to have contact with Annie for a few years. In that time both girls changed and things between them were never quite the same again.

Lexie still feels responsible for her sister and tries, again and again, to help Annie to break her addiction. Finally, Lexie must cut ties in order to keep herself safe and allow her to live her life, which she is finally getting back when Annie contacts her again.

It is hard to say no to family when they need help, and when Lexie finds out that Annie is pregnant she becomes determined to do everything that she can to support Annie to get clean and so that she can keep her baby. But what will the consequences be for Lexie?

I really did enjoy reading Before I Let You Go, the characters were realistic and I cared about what was going to happen for them. Kelly Rimmer really is a skilled author whose books I will continue to read, enjoy and possibly shed a tear over.

Thank you to Kelly Rimmer and Headline for a copy of Before I Let You Go. I was under no obligation to review the book and all thoughts are my own.

Blurb:

Before I Let You Go CoverYour sister or her baby. Who do you choose? A moving page-turner with a heart-pounding dilemma. As children, Lexie and Annie were incredibly close. Bonded by the death of their beloved father, they weathered the storms of life together. When Lexie leaves home to follow her dream, Annie is forced to turn to her leatherbound journal as the only place she can confide her deepest secrets and fears… As adults, sisters Lexie and Annie could not be more different. Lexie is a successful doctor and happily engaged. Annie is an addict – a thief, a liar and unable to remain clean. When Annie’s newborn baby is in danger of being placed in foster care, Annie picks up the phone to beg her sister for help. Will Lexie agree to take in her young niece? And how will Annie survive, losing the only thing in her life worth living for?

About The Author:

Kelly Rimmer Author Picture

Kelly Rimmer is the USA Today bestselling women’s fiction author of five novels, including Me Without You and The Secret Daughter. She lives in rural Australia with her husband, two children and fantastically naughty dogs, Sully and Basil. Her novels have been translated into more than twenty languages.

 

 

Before I Let You Go by Kelly Rimmer is out now in ebook and paperback and is available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.