blog tours, giveaway

#BlogTour #giveaway The Tall Man by Phoebe Lock. #TheTallMan @wildfirebks #competition

The Tall Man Blog Tour Poster

Today it’s my stop on the blog tour for The Tall Man by Phoebe Locke. This book is getting a lot of good reviews so I’m delighted to offer a copy of the book to giveaway, details of how to enter are below. First here’s a bit about the book.

Blurb:

The Tall Man CoverYOU DON’T FIND HIM… HE FINDS YOU.

‘THE MUST-READ SUMMER CHILLER’ – Daily Express

‘IF YOU READ JUST ONE PSYCHOLOGICAL THRILLER THIS YEAR – MAKE IT THE TALL MAN’ – CultureFly

The Tall Man is an ADDICTIVE and UNFORGETTABLE blend of psychological suspense and spine-tingling chills that will be perfect for fans of Stephen King, Ruth Ware, Sarah Pinborough’s BEHIND HER EYES. If you love STRANGER THINGS, prepare to be haunted by THE TALL MAN.

A SENSELESS MURDER. A TERRIFYING LEGEND. A FAMILY HAUNTED.

1990: In the darkest woods, three girls devote themselves to a sinister figure.

2000: A young mother disappears, leaving behind her husband and baby daughter.

2018: A teenage girl is charged with murder, and her trial will shock the world.

Three chilling events, connected by the shadow he casts.

He is the Tall Man. He can make you special…

Giveaway:

So if that whet your appetite for the book then you can enter to win a copy. Open to those with a UK postal address only.

For your chance to win click here to enter. Good luck!

About The Author:

Phoebe LockePHOEBE LOCKE is the pseudonym of full-time writer Nicci Cloke. She previously
worked at the Faber Academy, and hosted London literary salon Speakeasy.
Nicci has had two literary novels published by Fourth Estate and Cape, and
also writes YA for Hot Key Books. She lives and writes in London. THE TALL MAN
is Phoebe Locke’s debut thriller.

The Tall Man by Phoebe Locke is out now and available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

4*, blog tours, book review

#BlogTour #BookReview Follow Me Home by DK Hood. @bookouture @DKHood #thriller

Follow Me Home - Blog tour.jpg

My Review:

I really like this series, I love Sherrif Jenna Alton and her relationship with Deputy Kane. They’re great characters to read about and I love the chemistry between them.

Being set in a small town works really well too, but it does mean that a lot has to happen to keep the series interesting and the reader engaged. I can go with that though as I love the setting, the remoteness adds to the story and there are so many places for baddies to hide.

This is the third book in the series, I think that they could be read as a standalone but it would be better to start at the beginning as you’ll get so much more out of the story if you know what happened before.

Once again Hood takes the reader on a journey, the clock is ticking and Alton and her team need to find a killer before more people meet a gruesome end. I was hooked straight in and enjoyed trying to work out the whodunnit. I do think that this is the weakest of the series so far, but given how good the previous books have been I wouldn’t let that put you off. I’m now waiting eagerly for book four.

Thank you to Bookouture for a copy of Follow Me Home by DK Hood, I was under no obligation to review the book and all thoughts are my own.

Blurb:

Follow-Me-Home-Kindle‘Don’t you agree Detective? That some people deserve to die? I’ve killed the first. I’ve killed the second. Now will you catch the others, or do I have to kill them too?’

The body of Amos Price lies in a pool of blood on the polished floor of an otherwise empty house. With no signs of a break in, and no clues left at the scene, Detective Jenna Alton is at a loss.

But as the team begins to unpick the life of the reclusive victim, they discover a disturbing link between Amos and the disappearance of several young girls in the county going back years.

Days later, another brutally murdered body is found, in a remote motel on the outskirts of town. Ely Dorsey was killed in a frenzied attack and Jenna fears not only that the murders are connected to the missing girls, but that the killer hasn’t finished yet.

As Jenna tries to work out who will be next, the killer suddenly starts sending her deputy, David Kane, messages. Is she being taunted? Or does the murderer want to be caught? And will Jenna discover who’s behind these killings before more people die?

An absolutely nail-biting thriller with plenty of twists, Follow Me Home is perfect for fans of Robert Dugoni, Karin Slaughter and Rachel Abbott.

 About The Author:

17096652I’ve always had a wicked sense of humour and was the kid who told the ghost stories around the campfire. I am lucky to have family all over the world and have spent many vacations in places from Paris France to Montana USA and Australia. I use the wonderful memories from these visits to enhance my stories.
My interest in the development of forensic science to solve crime goes back many years. I enjoy writing crime, mystery and thrillers. With many stories, waiting for me to write I’ll look forward to sharing many spine-tingling stories with you.

D.K. Hood is an active member of International Thriller Writers.

Author Social Media Links:

Website: www.dkhood.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dkhoodauthor/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/DKHood_Author

Follow Me Home by DK Hood is out now and is available to buy using this link.

4*, blog tours, book review, Children's books

#BlogTour #BookReview #Kidsbook Stripey Enid by Natasha Lea. @beercottbooks @NatashaLea1

stripeyenid

My Review:

Stripey Enid is a funny little book, it feels more like a leaflet when you look at it but once you open it you will find a lovely little book.

The story is very simple, we are all different and that we are all ok just as we are. This is such an important message to teach our children and it is presented in a really clear and simple way which will work well for young readers.

My daughter aged seven read it and felt that it was too babyish for her, probably simply because of the size of the font used as she now wants smaller writing that’s more grown up. But it did get us talking about how we are different and how that makes us more interesting.

I’m not really sure what age Stripey Enid is aimed at as it would seem at first glance that it is aimed at four and under but there are parts, like where the child can list five of their good points, that seem aimed at older children. I think that in reality all young children will get something out of reading Stripey Enid, and it is a great way of starting conversations about how we are all different.

Thank you to the publisher, Beercott Books, for a copy of Stripey Enid by Natasha Lea. I was under no obligation to review the book and all thoughts are my own.

Blurb:

stripeyenidcover‘Believe in yourself, for you are unique!’

In this ever-changing world our children are bombarded with ‘image’ driven ideals of what is accepted as normal, or what we should aspire to be.

The reality is we are all unique and should be proud of it.

Stripey Enid has no colour or creed, she is just a friend. Using simple verse and interactive tasks, she aims to help your child understand that it is good to be unique, and that being yourself is all you need to be.

About The Author:

natashaleaIt was over 10 years ago, during a marketing exercise to promote a new theatre company whilst studying Performing Arts, that the idea of Stripey Enid came to Natasha.

Even back then, Stripey was seen to be different, something to challenge the norm, ask questions of people.

The idea of writing a book was never the intention but a natural progression on from the poems Natasha used to create for friends and family for birthdays & special occasions.

At the time Natasha was also working with a local Brownie pack and it was this interaction that made her realise that she was an adult in these children’s lives that wasn’t a parent or a teacher but a friend, a unique friendship that benefitted both parties.

Stripey came into being by the pure belief that Natasha had about peer pressure & social demands creating barriers between people, stopping people from seeing others as they truly are.

Stripey Enid by Natasha Lea is out on 16th June 2018 and is available to pre-order from Amazon UK or direct from the publisher.

5*, blog tours, book review

#BlogTour #Bookreview Th1rt3en by Steve Cavanagh. @SSCav @orionbooks #Thirteen #book #backablogger #greatread

THIRTEEN BLOG TOUR (002).png

My Review:

I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I started to read Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh, I used to read a lot of American crime books but now I rarely do and wondered whether this book would change that.

I loved the concept of having a trial influenced by someone on the jury, let alone that someone being the person who committed the crime that trial is for. But when I started the book I didn’t know that that was what the book was about, as I had heard about it from other bloggers and how much they had loved it so I read it on that alone. It didn’t take me long to work out and I have to say that I loved it, such a different concept to the standard court drama and one that hooked me and kept me right there, devouring the pages as I discovered just how far he was willing to go to get the result that he wanted.

What he hadn’t banked on was defence lawyer, Eddie Flynn, being brought in at the last moment and his different approach causes problems for our naughty juror. Eddie was a great character, totally believable and definitely a lawyer that I’d like to have on my side if I were ever to face a trial. He also provided some lighter relief from the darkness that surrounded the juror.

I really enjoyed reading Thirteen, it has a very clever premise and is well written and I was sad when it ended. I will definitely be reading more from Steve Cavanagh, and I will definitely be reading more American crime fiction again.

Thank you to the publisher, Orion Books, and Tracey Fenton, for a copy of Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh. I was under no obligation to review the book and all thoughts are my own.

Blurb:

thirteen

THE SERIAL KILLER ISN’T ON TRIAL.

HE’S ON THE JURY…

 

They were Hollywood’s hottest power couple. They had the world at their feet. Now one of them is dead and Hollywood star Robert Solomon is charged with the brutal murder of his beautiful wife.

This is the celebrity murder trial of the century and the defence want one man on their team: con artist turned lawyer Eddie Flynn.

All the evidence points to Robert’s guilt, but as the trial begins a series of sinister incidents in the court room start to raise doubts in Eddie’s mind.

What if there’s more than one actor in the courtroom?

What if the killer isn’t on trial? What if the killer is on the jury?

About The Author:

stevecavanaghSteve Cavanagh was born and raised in Belfast before leaving for Dublin at the age of eighteen to study Law. He currently practices civil rights law and has been involved in several high profile cases; in 2010 he represented a factory worker who suffered racial abuse in the workplace and won the largest award of damages for race discrimination in Northern Ireland legal history. He holds a certificate in Advanced Advocacy and lectures on various legal subjects (but really he just likes to tell jokes). He is married with two young children.

Find out more at www.stevecavanaghbooks.com or follow Steve on Twitter @SSCav.

Th1rt3en by Steve Cavanagh is out now and available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

blog tours

#BlogTour The Man Who Lived Twice by David Taylor. @matadorbooks #ManWhoLivedTwice

Ok. So here’s the thing. I’m currently on holiday on Cornwall, staying on a farm and enjoying the typical British weather. There’s almost zero phone reception and no WiFi. The guest post for this post didn’t arrive before I left so I’m standing with my arms on the air trying to get reception enough to do this post. Now to me the guest post looks like a bunch of emojis, I’ve tried and failed to get letters but it isn’t happening. So I hope that when it posts you get words instead of yellow people but if not I’ll have to fix it next week when I’m home.

Guest post

WHAT I’M READING

Sexism and gender inequality were so rampant in the nineteenth century that poor put-upon female writers adopted masculine pseudonyms. The Bronte sisters were Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell while Mary Ann Evans called herself George Eliot. Now the literary wheel has turned half circle and I am seriously thinking of writing my next novel under an empowering pen name like Meghan Middleton. Short of conjuring up Harry Potter-like magical realism in children’s literature or whipping through Fifty Shades of erotica, a novelist is most likely to achieve best-selling success by being a young female graduate churning out psychological thrillers with the word ‘Girl’ in the title.

Putting gender to one side, I think fluctuating literary taste is a fascinating subject. Why have novels with a domestic setting suddenly become so popular? Is domestic noir a way of escaping from our safe and mundane lives into a fictional world of dysfunctional family relationships where those we love, betray us? Do we really want a dead body in our garage and the police inspector knocking at the door?

The person best qualified to answer these questions is Minette Walters who made herself the queen of the psychological crime by composing a series of chilling thrillers in the nineties about murderous villages in which unholy passions lurked behind drawn curtains. But Walters is no longer writing this kind of book, preferring to swim against the tide she helped to create by pursuing the less fashionable literary genre of historical fiction. Her latest novel The Last Hours is a sweeping saga about a small Dorset community’s struggle to survive the Black Death and I must say I am really enjoying it.

I always seem to learn something from reading this kind of novel, particularly when its set in a far-off age about which I know very little. The other thing historical fiction always seems to do is to stimulate the imagination. It is, after all, a kind of mental time travelling. In Walters’s novel, the reader is taken back to 1348 when the ‘great pestilence’ decimated Dorset before killing off more than half the population of England. At that time, we were a rural and agrarian society bound by the iron-clad hierarchies of the feudal system and the equally rigid certainties of the Catholic faith. People led simple lives. They had little idea of personal hygiene and no understanding of how a disease like the bubonic plague might be transmitted. All they saw was the result: the swollen lymph nodes, the large suppurating boils, the gangrene and the black blood leading to death within a matter of days. Since nothing happened that was not God’s will, it was obvious that He had sent this plague to punish sinful men. But if that was true why hadn’t the church warned everyone it was coming?

In writing about this utter catastrophe Minette Walters imagines a Dorset demesne in which, to avoid the disease, everyone withdraws inside the boundary walls of the moated manor house. This self-imposed isolation works for a while until supplies run short whereupon the class system breaks down and Jack is seen to be as good as his master. Walters has been criticised for giving her serfs an oddly modern awareness but I would dispute this. Who knows what fourteenth century peasants thought or how they behaved when their social structure collapsed around them. Their views are not recorded in history. That’s why we need fiction.

I had exactly the same feeling when I wrote my most recent novel The Man Who Lived Twice. The record revealed that Colonel George St Leger Grenfell was an amazing fellow; a military hero who was also a complete rogue. But evidence is always partial. Facts are not truth, though they are part of it. History told me what Grenfell did but it didn’t tell me what he thought or felt, and that’s what really mattered. My chief concern as a novelist has to be with the interior drama of my characters’ lives.

I had been wondering whether to change my literary genre but perhaps, after all, I will stick with what I know. If your heart isn’t in what you are writing, you will only make yourself miserable. It’s better to write what you care about which, in my case, is the kind of biographical history that offers the reader a bit of adventure and romance. But I am still thinking of softening my rough edges by writing as a woman.

WHAT I’M READING
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Blurb:

The Man Who Lived TwiceThe Man Who Lived Twice is a panoramic novel that follows the exploits of Colonel George St Leger Grenfell, a courageous but deeply flawed Cornish cavalryman who was the highest ranked British officer in the Confederate army in the American Civil War.
A hero to General Robert E Lee and a legend to the gullible hillbillies under his command, Ole St Lege charged with the Light Brigade in the Crimea, hacked his way through the Opium War and defended the bullet-strewn barricades in the Indian Mutiny. Yet the mercenary that performed these feats of derring-do was a wanted criminal, a fraudster who bankrupted his own father.
In his search for redemption, Grenfell faces the raw realities of late nineteenth century America. He is frequently shot at and brutally tortured by prison guards, soars precariously over enemy lines in a balloon and rides the rails to the Old West, meeting the characters who made, marred and mythologised the American century: the beautiful spies and back-shooting gunslingers as well as the business tycoons and Lincoln conspirators. And somehow he survives to lead a better life.

About the Author:

David TaylorDavid Taylor was educated at the Royal Grammar School Newcastle and at University College London where he read history and was president of the students’ union. He has won national and international awards for print, radio and television journalism. His book Web of Corruption was published by Granada. He wrote for the Guardian and the Daily Telegraph, reported for Panorama and World in Action, presented BBC2 series on defence and civil nuclear power, edited Radio 4’s current affairs programme File on 4 and BBC2’s Brass Tacks and On The Line, produced several series of Great Railway Journeys and of the Wainwright and Fred Dibnah programmes and was head of BBC Features before forming an independent production company called Triple Echo which has won scores of awards, mainly for adventure broadcasting. His book Web of Corruption was published by Granada.

The Man Who Lived Twice by David Taylor is out now and available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

4*, blog tours, book review, psychological thriller

#BlogTour #BookReview The Old You by Louise Voss. @LouiseVoss1 @OrendaBooks #TheOldYou #backablogger

FINAL Old You blog poster 2018 copy.jpg

My Review:

The Old You by Louise Voss is a great read. Right from the start I was hooked and wanted to know what was going to happen. At first everything seemed perfectly normal, but of course, things aren’t always as they appear and this is certainly true in this case.

Lynn is blissfully happy with her life, she loves her husband Ed and she has a new job that she really likes. But when Ed receives an upsetting diagnosis, things suddenly change.

With the help of chapters showing what happened in the past, we realise that things really aren’t as they seem and that Lynn is hiding a huge secret. Who do we believe? Is Ed as innocent as he seems?

This is a twisted read that will have the reader thinking one thing but really not sure whether that is what’s going on or not. I worked a lot of it out well before it was officially revealed but that didn’t matter, and although the whole thing is slightly implausible, it still makes for a great, twisty read.

Thank you to the publisher, Orenda Books, for a copy of The Old You by Louise Voss. I was under no obligation to review the book and all thoughts are my own.

Blurb:

Nail-bitingly modern domestic noir
A tense, Hitchcockian psychological thriller
Louise Voss returns with her darkest, most chilling, novel yet…

Lynn Naismith gave up the job she loved when she married Ed, the love of her life, but it was worth it for the happy years they enjoyed together. Now, ten years on, Ed has been diagnosed with early-onset dementia, and things start to happen; things more sinister than missing keys and lost words. As some memories are forgotten, others, long buried, begin to surface… and Lynn’s perfect world begins to crumble.
But is it Ed s mind playing tricks, or hers…?

About The Author:

LOUISE VOSSOver her eighteen-year writing career, Louise Voss has had eleven
novels published – five solo and six co-written with Mark Edwards: a
combination of psychological thrillers, police procedurals and
contemporary fiction – and sold over 350,000 books. Louise has an
MA (Dist) in Creative Writing and also works as a literary consultant
and mentor for writers at http://www.thewritingcoach.co.uk. She lives in
South-West London and is a proud member of two female crime-
writing collectives, The Slice Girls and Killer Women.

The Old You by Louise Voss is out now and available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

blog tours, book extract

#BlogTour #extract Guilt by Amanda Robson @Amandarauthor @AvonBooksUK @Sabah_k #book

Banner Guilt.png

How stunning is the cover for Guilt by Amanda Robson?!!! You certainly wouldn’t miss it in a bookshop. I love it and it immediately appealed to me, and then I saw that the book is about twins and as a mother of twins I like reading books with twins in it, so I jumped at the chance to be part of the blog tour. I just didn’t have time to read the book before today to do a review, but it is definitely on my tbr pile. In the meantime here’s an extract to help whet your appetite before you read the book yourself!

Extract:

Driving up the motorway, escaping from Bristol, back to Tidebury for the weekend. Maybe seeing Mother will help.

  I hate Anastasia Sudbury.

  Second written warning indeed.

One more written warning and I am out. How dare she. Patronising, sycophantic bitch. The memory of her voice, with its overemphasised vowels and artificial resonance as she ‘mediated’ between me and Sebastian makes me feel sick. Second written warning for not working efficiently with him. I clutch the steering wheel so tightly my fingers ache.

I turn the car radio up in an attempt to drown my thoughts in classical music. But my mind is pumping. Plaintive violins and resonant cellos don’t help. I cannot stop thinking about Sebastian and what he did to me. I feel his hands all over me. I feel him entering me again. I hear his grunting climax. I feel a knife grating the walls of my vaginal passage. As I drive I breathe through the pain.

I stop at a service station and sit in the car, head in hands.

Back on the motorway, I know I need to pull myself together. It isn’t safe, even in the slow lane, wedged between heavy lorries, driving when my mind is a kaleidoscope of hate, guilt and pain.

Classical music. Perhaps that will help. Four hours of listening to Classic FM later, at half past midnight I finally arrive home.

Mother opens the door. She hugs and kisses me. I step into the hallway. I see our patterned rug, the parquet flooring, the limited edition print that you chose when we were on holiday in the Lake District, so many years ago.

Blurb:

guiltbookThe shocking new thriller from the #1 bestseller

‘Thrilling, unputdownable, a fabulous rollercoaster of a read’ B A PARIS, bestselling author of BEHIND CLOSED DOORS

The number 1 bestseller is back!

Your sister. Her secret. The betrayal.

 There is no bond greater than blood . . .

When the body of a woman is found stabbed to death, the blame falls to her twin sister. But who killed who? And which one is now the woman behind bars?

Zara and Miranda have always supported each other. But then Zara meets Seb, and everything changes. Handsome, charismatic and dangerous, Seb threatens to tear the sisters’ lives apart – but is he really the one to blame? Or are deeper resentments simmering beneath the surface that the sisters must face up to?

As the sisters’ relationship is stretched to the brink, a traumatic incident in Seb’s past begins to rear its head and soon all three are locked in a psychological battle that will leave someone dead. The question is, who?

Claustrophobic and compelling, Amanda Robson is back in a knock-out thriller perfect for fans of B.A. Paris and Paula Hawkins.

About The Author:

amanda-robson-profile

After graduating, Amanda Robson worked in medical research at The London School of Hygiene and Tropical medicine, and at the Poison’s Unit at Guy’s hospital where she became a co-author of a book on cyanide poisoning.

This has set her in good stead for writing her debut novel, Obsession, a dark and twisted tale about love affairs gone wrong.

Amanda attended the Faber Academy writing course in 2011, and now writes from home full time. She lives in London and Wales, with her lawyer husband, one–eyed dog and unfriendly cat. Her two sons, also lawyers, have more or less, fled the nest.

Guilt by Amanda Robson is out now and available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.