#review The Fox In The Box by @AmandaGeeAuthor illustrated by Lee Holland.

 

thefoxinthebox

The Fox in the Box by Amanda Gee.

 

My Review:

When author Amanda Gee was asking for people to read and review her children’s book, The Fox In The Box I thought that it was probably a bit young for my almost seven year old children, but the cover was so adorable that I couldn’t resist.

And I’m so pleased that I didn’t. We all loved the book, the cute illustrations by Lee Holland work so perfectly with the story, it was fun to read and made my children think about animals and their homes. This really is a wonderful book, it is short but perfect and the rhyming words work really well. The font is clear and easy to read, although my children regularly ask me to read it to them they are both able to read it themselves too.

After reading this book I will definitely be looking out for more from Amanda Gee and I will definitely be buying The Fox in the Box as presents.

Blurb:

When Lydia finds a lost baby fox outside her back door, they set off together to look for his family. But on the way, they discover a terrible disaster is about to overtake their village. Can they stop it…..and will the cub find what he’s looking for?

About the Author:

I have lived in Suffolk all my life and have had a passion for the environment and wildlife for a very long time. In my books for children as well as teaching them about friendship and kindness, I am trying to help educate them about the fantastic world we live in and the amazing animals we share it with.

The Fox In The Box by Amanda Gee and illustrated by Lee Holland is out now and available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

Review: The Giant Jumperee by Julia Donaldson and illustrated by Helen Oxenbury.

 

thegiantjumperee

The Giant Jumperee by Julia Donaldson.

 

My 5* Review:

I’m not sure that there is a parent or child in the world that doesn’t love at least one Julia Donaldson book. I have six year old twins and her books are often read at bedtime in my house, The Highway Rat being the favourite. Another favourite book is We’re Going On a Bear Hunt which is illustrated by Helen Oxenbury. So when I saw that The Giant Jumperee was written by Julia Donaldson and illustrated by Helen Oxenbury I knew that I had to read this book to my children.

We read it on my paperwhite kindle which worked fine but I’m sure that we didn’t get to fully appreciate the wonderful drawings. My children didn’t seem in the least bit bothered as they snuggled close to get a look at the pictures, there were lots of giggles as we read and a few squeals of excitement as they tried to work out what the jumperee might be.

The book is short, it is a very quick read and I think aimed at the younger end of Julia Donaldson fans. My children were probably at the upper end of the target audience and I think that it would be perfect for those who were not quite ready for the scary Gruffalo. It would also be a good book for a young reader to read to an adult.

Overall, this is a wonderful book that I’m sure will be very popular with young children and their parents.

Thank you to the publisher, Penguin Random House, for the opportunity to read The Giant Jumperee.

Blurb:

Rabbit was hopping home one day when he heard a loud voice coming from inside his burrow. “I’M THE GIANT JUMPEREE AND I’M SCARY AS CAN BE!” When Rabbit’s friends Cat, Bear and Elephant come to help they are each scared away in turn by the mysterious voice.

He can squash you like a flee

He will sting you like a bee

And he’s taller than a tree!

But who is the Giant Jumperee?

A new read-aloud classic from internationally bestselling author Julia Donaldson, beautifully brought to life by award-winning illustrator Helen Oxenbury.

About the author:

Julia Donaldson is the outrageously talented, prize-winning author of the world’s best-loved picture books, and was the 2011-2013 UK Children’s Laureate. Her books include Room on the Broom, Stick Man, What the Ladybird Heard and the modern classics The Gruffalo, the The Gruffalo’s Child which have sold 17 million copies worldwide and has been translated into seventy languages. Julia also writes fiction as well as poems, plays and songs and her brilliant live children’s shows are always in demand. Julia and her husband Malcolm divide their time between Sussex and Edinburgh.

About the illustrator:

As a child

Growing up in Ipswich, England, Helen Oxenbury loved nothing more than drawing. As a teenager, she entered art school and basked in the pleasure of drawing, and nothing but drawing, all day. During vacations she helped out at the Ipswich Repertory Theatre workshop, mixing paints for set designers. It was there that she decided her future lay in theatre design. While studying costume design, however, Helen was told by a teacher, “This is hopeless, you know. You ought to go and do illustrations – you’re much more interested in the character, and we don’t know who’s going to play the part!”

As an adult

Sets and scenery, not books, remained Helen’s preoccupation for her early adult life as she embarked on careers in theatre, film, and TV. After marrying John Burningham, another of the world’s most eminent children’s book illustrators, and giving birth to their first child, at last she turned to illustrating children’s books. “When I had babies,” Helen says, “I wanted to be home with them and look for something to do there.” Helen and her husband make their home in London, where the she works in a nearby studio. She is also an avid tennis player.

As an artist

Today, Helen is among the most popular and critically acclaimed illustrators of her time. Her numerous books for children include the Kate Greenaway Medal-winning Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll; Smarties Book Prize-winning Farmer Duck by Martin Waddell; We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen; Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes, written by Mem Fox, as well as her classic board books for babies. And what does she love most about her work? Thinking up new ideas? Seeing the finished book? Not at all. For Helen, “The best part is when I think I know what I’m doing and I’ve completed a few drawings. In fact, when I get about a third of the way through, and I feel I’m on my way, then I’m happy. It’s like reading a good book – you don’t want it to end.”

The Giant Jumperee by Julia Donaldson and illustrated by Helen Oxenbury is published in the UK on April 2nd 2017 and is available to pre-order from Amazon UK. It will be published in America on April 18th 2017 and is available to pre-order from Amazon US now.

Review: My Underpants Rule by Kate and Rod Power.

 

my-underpants-rule

My Underpants Rule by Kate and Rod Power.

 

My 5* review:

I think that it is so important to do our best to teach our children how to keep themselves safe, while at the same time not scaring them so that they don’t trust anyone! This book does the job really well.

It is bright and colourful and rhymes well, my two nearly six-year-olds love it, they think that it is fun to read but the questions in it ensure that they are listening and taking in what I’m reading. I really like that it includes the fact that sometimes people do need to see under their underpants, like a doctor or Mummy if they’re sore or unwell. I also like how easily it opens up discussions on who they know who is a safe person that they can talk to.

This book has so many positives and no negatives that I’ve found. If you want to help explain to your child/ren about keeping safe without worrying them about it then this book is a great place to start. I’d suggest that it would be suitable for children aged four to eight, with maybe a bit of leeway each side depending on the child.

Thank you to the authors for writing such a helpful book in such a fun way.

Blurb:

Rolf Harris, Jimmy Saville, Gary Glitter… Our children need education for protection and parents need engaging tools to do this. My Underpants Rule! is fun, bright and lively, encouraging toddlers and primary children to empower themselves without causing alarm. “What’s under my pants belongs only to me!” is reinforced by rhymes and scenarios, ingraining what is appropriate and inappropriate, and what to do in difficult situations. Like a nursery rhyme, reading this book with your child will ensure the lessons stay with them for life.

The Underpants Rule is out now and available from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

Review: The Goblin Princess: Smoky The Dragon Baby by Jenny O’Connor.

 

img_4405

The Goblin Princess: Smokey The Dragon Baby by Jenny O’Connor.

 

My 5* Review:

When I produced The Goblin Princess to read to my nearly six year old boy/girl twins they were both excited as the cover and the pictures look great. We normally read one chapter a night before bed but both begged me to read more, they just loved the story and the characters. They talked about it in the day and often said that they couldn’t wait for bedtime to read more.

The book itself felt lovely with a high quality cover and paper inside. The illustrations were beautifully done and my children appreciated having coloured pictures to go with a chapter book. The characters were fun and they loved the made up world that created the goblin world. I am so pleased that this is the start of a new series, as we really want to read more!

I leant the book to my niece aged 8 and my nephew aged 7. He refused to read it as it was ‘for girls’ and my niece read it and enjoyed it but said that she felt that it was for younger children as it was quite easy to read. I wouldn’t think that children younger than five would get as much out of it, so I’d say that the book would be best for 5-8 year olds, dependant on their characters and what they enjoy and whether a boy will think it’s too girly! Thankfully my children loved it.

I was given a copy of The Goblin Princess: Smoky the Dragon Baby by the publisher in return for an honest review.

Blurb:

‘I’m so worried about Matty. Her room is always tidy and her clothes are spotless. Last week I even caught her combing her hair!’

The first book using the characters from the hugely popular The Goblin Princess comic strip in Sparkle World magazine, and with gorgeous green pages and illustrations throughout, this is the start of an exciting new series perfect for readers moving on from Rainbow Magic, or who like a slightly different version of a fairy story!

Everything is topsy-turvy in Goblin world and Matty, the Goblin Princess, just doesn’t fit in! Her mum, the Goblin Queen, is always telling her to un-tidy her room and eat up her slug porridge (yee-uk!). Goblins HATE nice things, including their enemies the sparkly Forest Fairies…

Matty has a problem. Her new pet baby dragon, Smoky, is far too good and her parents are threatening to send him away! Smoky is her best friend – can she find a way to make him naughty enough to keep? She just might need the Forest Fairies’ help…

 

The Goblin Princess: Smoky the Dragon Baby is available now from Amazon UK and Amazon US.

Henry Hodges Needs a Friend by Andy Andrews

henry hodges

Henry Hodges Needs a Friend by Andy Andrews

Another children’s book! This time a 3* read.

‘I wanted to read Henry Hodges Needs a Friend because my son has struggled with making friends at school, and although things are much better now I still felt that it would be good to read a book about it.

Little Henry is sad because he has no friends, so his parents take him to a rescue centre and he finds the perfect dog who becomes his best friend. Sounds lovely doesn’t it? What’s not to like? Well actually I didn’t like some of it. There were no attempts to help Henry make friends, and while I think that it’s absolutely wonderful that Henry has his dog to be his friend, I don’t think that should be portrayed as a good solution for a child struggling to make friends. It’s a bit like ‘you have no one to play with? I know, let’s get a dog!’

So while it’s a sweet little story it is not something that I will read for my son, he’d be on at me to get a dog!!

I received a copy of Henry Hodges Needs a Friend from the publishers via Netgalley in return for an honest review.

A Tale of Two Daddies by Vanita Oelschlager

a tale of two daddies

A Tale of Two Daddies by Vanita Oelschlager

A bit of a change for If Only I Could Read Faster with a children’s book! I’m sure that many of you won’t be interested in it but some of you might be, especially when it’s a 5* book that helps normalise different family set ups to children.

‘A Tale of Two Daddies tells the story of a little girl who is asked lots of questions by a friend in the park about life with two Daddies. The story normalises such a family set up which is wonderful to read. The little girl answers the questions in a matter of fact way, helping her friend to understand that having two Daddies is really no different from having a Mummy and a Daddy.

Bonus points to this book for producing a book that will help children to understand different family make ups and that they are still families. My children liked this book and the clear pictures, they are already aware of different family set ups but it is good to reinforce that.

I received a copy of A Tale of Two Daddies by the publishers via Netgalley in return for an honest review.’

A Tale of Two Daddies is available from Amazon UK